Project 5

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ownyourownuniverse@gmail.com

5 thematically linked albums.

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Terri Hendrix Project 5 Information Sheet
About Project 5
Love You Strong Project 5.1
The Slaughterhouse Sessions Project 5.2
Talk to a Human Project 5.3
Who is Ann? Project 5.4
Pilgrim's Progress Project 5.5
PDF Terri Hendrix Project 5 Info Sheet.p
Adobe Acrobat Document 3.5 MB

Pilgrim's Progress Project 5.5

Project 5.5 Digital Release: “Pilgrim's Progress”

Home. 

Release Date: Sept. 3rd 2021

This album just feels right. It brings Project 5 home. And though in many ways it’s very different from any other album I’ve ever made — being all covers and almost all one style (country, for my dad!) — I can promise you that Pilgrim’s Progress really is the perfect bookend for the series that began back in 2016 with Love You Strong (Project 5.1.) I’ve embraced some of these songs my entire career (some even my entire life). Other songs on this album also embody the recurring themes and message of the other four albums in the series. This one's theme is "home." I long last, Project 5 is done. 

 

 

TERRI HENDRIX TO RELEASE NEW ALBUM, PILGRIM’S PROGRESS — ON SEPTEMBER 3RD — AS THE FINAL INSTALLMENT OF HER PROJECT 5 CYCLE 

 

The Texas singer-songwriter and her producer Lloyd Maines “keep it country” on her first all-covers album, featuring songs by Kris Kristofferson, Dolly Parton, John Prine, and Jerry Jeff Walker — and a very special cameo by her first guitar teacher: Command Sergeant Major James Hendrix.

 

MARTINDALE, Texas — In the end, almost nothing about Terri Hendrix’s “Project 5” went the way she planned it, including the ending itself. But now that she’s crossed the finish line, it’s hard to imagine a more fitting — and satisfying — finale than her new album, Pilgrim’s Progress (Project 5.5). Recorded in early 2021 with her longtime producer Lloyd Maines, it’s unlike anything else in the prolific Texas singer-songwriter’s 25-year recording career, and not just because she didn’t write a single word or note. It’s the first album she’s ever made for which she curtailed her famously eclectic, all-over-the-map disregard for genre lines in a concerted effort to stay in one lane, start to finish — but only by very special request. 

 

Her father asked her if she could please make a record of his kind of music: country music. For him. And as Hendrix notes with a smile, he didn’t ask just once, either. 

 

“He’s wanted me to do that forever,” she says. “And I was finally like, ‘Ok, why not? And ... why not now?’”

 

True as that may be, though, the significance of Hendrix deciding to not only “finally” get around to honoring her father’s wish but to record and release Pilgrim’s Progress as the capstone to Project 5 cannot be overstated. That’s because up until late 2020, the fifth and final chapter was supposed to be something else entirely. “Four thematically linked albums and a book” was how she framed it when announcing the project back in late 2015, noting that each piece of the “big picture” would be unique unto itself but share with the others the recurring threads of love, hope, and resilience. The albums would all come first in quick succession, and the book, a memoir detailing Hendrix’s experiences coping with a seizure disorder throughout her long career as a touring musician, would tie the whole package together with a proverbial bow. 

 

Oh, and she also originally intended to release all five components within the span of a single year. 

 

Things didn’t quite work out that way. Although the first two albums, Love You Strong and The Slaughterhouse Sessions (subtitled Project 5.1 and 5.2, respectively), were released within a few months of each other in 2016, all manner of unforeseen circumstances made quick hash of the rest of her timeline. First a bout with double pneumonia pushed her deadline into 2017, and closing on the first six acres of her Wilory Farm in Martindale, Texas — and clearing the cactus and mesquite covered rocky land to make room for her nonprofit OYOU (“Own Your Own Universe”) arts center — moved it yet again. And then her whole world turned upside down on March 8, 2018, with the sudden death of her beloved older sister, mentor, and best friend, Tammi. The loss irreparably changed Hendrix and stopped her dead in her tracks.

 

“She was and remains part of my heart,” says Hendrix. “I walk around with half of a heart.”

 

But in time she forced herself slowly onward, wading step by heavy step through waves of anger and sorrow knowing that though she’d be pushing against the tide for the rest of her life, stasis would mean drowning. So she packed her 2019 calendar with as many gigs as possible in order to be able to buy an adjacent plot of land and double the size of Wilory Farm, all the while balancing a full plate of OYOU workshops, concerts series, festivals, and retreats. She leaned full-tilt back into writing and recording, too, and that October released what she and her fans believed to be the final two audio components of Project 5: the defiantly open-hearted album Talk to a Human, and an EP-length, electronica-laced study in grief and courage intriguingly titled Who is Ann? (“Ann” being the closet techno-fanatic folkie’s middle name). Buoyed by her second wind, Hendrix optimistically reported that her memoir was on pace for imminent completion — blissfully unaware that in early 2020, the whole world’s world would be turned upside down by a global pandemic. With the cancellation of every gig on her calendar for months on end, she had to immediately pivot all of her creative energies into producing both a steady stream of online workshops for the OYOU and a monthly virtual concert series, “Live from Wilory Farm,” just to stay afloat. 

 

Meanwhile, in that same span of time she was also diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia and an essential vocal tremor. She was told by doctors it could have happened from overuse (from her heavy workload that year) or possibly even trauma (her sister’s death). Whatever the cause, the ramifications were serious. Through years of trial and error with different prescriptions, diets, and alternative treatments (including, most recently and successfully, a CBD tincture from the Austin-based dispensary Texas Original Compassionate Cultivation), Hendrix had long since figured out how to manage her focal epilepsy well enough to perform and even tour. But a brand new condition that could literally cripple her ability not just to sing but to even talk? That was enough for her to finally reach her breaking point.

 

“I grew increasingly depressed and hopeless, to where I wanted to just quit. I fell into a very dark place,” Hendrix says with no hint of exaggeration. 

 

But instead, something beautiful happened. At the point where she felt her resiliency at a critical all-time low, the unwavering patience and support of her fans, friends, and family loved her strong again. “My friends and fans sent cards and encouraging words, and when I lost all of my shows and workshops and the OYOU lost every single grant due to the pandemic and quarantine, their voluntary tips during the live streams and donations for the online workshops literally saved the farm, the OYOU, and me,” she says. “My fans latched on and did not let go, and they pulled me up and out of the darkness. And without them? Who knows ...”

 

Little by little, her hope began to spring anew, just like the “Earth Kind Rose” she’d written about on her Love You Strong album in 2016. And with it bloomed an epiphany: that the best way to finally close the proverbial “book” on her Project 5 was to bring the cycle about love, hope, and resiliency full circle back to where it all began. Back to Love You Strong’s title track, a song she wrote about her father and his unwavering devotion to being her mother’s full-time care giver. And then, all the way back to her early childhood, sitting on the edge of her bed holding the guitar she’d “borrowed” from her older sister while her dad taught her the handful of chords he knew. Then they’d figure out how to play and sing some of his favorite country songs together, like “Faded Love.” 

 

Soon, Terri would begin writing her own songs, inspired by her hero Dolly Parton, and her wildflower muse would lead her music far afield from her dad’s tastes. But they would always have Patsy Cline, and nearly five decades on, the unrepentantly progressive hippie folk singer and the staunchly conservative Korean and Vietnam War veteran have been known to still duet on the odd country classic when inspiration strikes. So in January 2021, the month that Command Sergeant Major James Hendrix celebrated his 88th birthday, his daughter at long last got to work on making a record devoted to his kind of music. 

 

Or at least close enough.

 

“It’s still not totally country enough for him,” she says with laugh. “But he’s really happy with it. And to see him really happy with something that Lloyd and I have created makes me happy.”

 

It all fell together remarkably quickly, too. “Kind of magically, really,” she marvels. “Part of that was just because I was really familiar with all of the songs and didn’t have to stress about the lyrics. Normally when I do a ‘regular’ record, with my own songs, I’m making edits up to the final minute. But with this one I just had to work out my vocal lines, and for everything else ... I completely, 100 percent handed the reins over to Lloyd. He took the whole thing and just ran with it, and he really shines in so many ways on it besides just playing like, 90 percent of the instruments. Like with ‘Faded Love’ — I mean, I grew up singing that song with my dad, but I didn’t want to record it at first because Patsy Cline already did the definitive version. But then Lloyd came up with this new arrangement for it that I think is a masterpiece.”

 

But that doesn’t mean Hendrix herself phoned anything in, though, because singing an entire album while working through, around, and with a vocal tremor is no cakewalk. Maines’ meticulous notes on phrasing helped, but every note still demanded a physical toll, like having to use her stomach muscles to control her voice. “I also drank whiskey, which relaxes the central nervous system and subdues the tremor enough to enable me to sing,” she says. “It’s not long term, but I dosed it like medicine for this project, and it got it done. But believe me, when you have a forced ‘happy hour’ at 10 a.m., it’s not fun.”

 

Needless to say, she wouldn’t have gone through all that effort just to sing a bunch of songs she didn’t believe in. There’s not a song on the record she doesn’t flat-out feel, making it every bit as revelatory, honest, and heartfelt as each of the four albums that preceded it in Project 5 (to say nothing of her dozen-plus releases on her own Wilory Records label that came before that, going back to her debut, Two Dollar Shoes, released 25 years ago this summer.) “Every song on here, I’ve lived and breathed the lyrics,” Hendrix says emphatically of Pilgrim’s Progress. “They’re in my DNA.” 

 

The 10-track collection opens with the disarmingly playful, fiddle-sweetened (courtesy of Dennis Ludiker) lament of “Me and the Moon Aren’t Speaking,” from the pen of native Texan and Country Music Hall-of-Famer Cindy Walker (making her second appearance in the Project 5 suite, after “Don’t Meddle in My Mood” on Talk to a Human.) That segues into the mournful but beautiful ache of “Faded Love” (written by Bob, John, and Billy Jack Wills), which in turn is followed by songs representing three of the best American songwriters of the last 60 years — two of whom sadly passed away in 2020: John Prine’s exuberantly uplifting “You Got Gold,” Dolly Parton’s free-spirited, Trio-era “Wildflowers,” and Jerry Jeff Walker’s exquisitely reflective “Little Bird.” 

 

Flip the digital-only record over, and “side two” kicks off with a nod to the proverbial “old country” via the Celtic/gypsy sway of “Fisherman’s Blues,” a knockout showcase for Maines’ majestic pedal steel chops that’s been a Hendrix fan-favorite ever since the Mike Scott/Waterboys classic was featured on Terri’s first live album, more than 20 years ago. Some of her earliest fans may recognize her cover of the Bottle Rockets’ “Get Down River” from bygone live shows, too. And though Hendrix admits that both of those tracks might take some liberties with the album’s whole “keep it country” mandate, she makes it up to her dad in spades with the easy loping shuffle of the Delmore Brothers’ “Blues Stay Away from Me.” In fact, James Hendrix even gets to sing on that one himself.

 

“That was a really beautiful experience, getting to sing with my dad on the record,” says Hendrix. “To me that’s what really made this the perfect bookend to the whole Project 5 journey. We wanted him to be on the album from the beginning, and it just seemed like a no-brainer to have him sing on that particular song, because it’s something he definitely relates to, being a full-time care giver to my mom. It’s a song we both feel, as a team, based on our personal experiences these past few years and from the way we’ve grown even closer since Tammi’s passing. That’s why we actually changed the lyrics a little bit. The original line in the verse he sings goes ‘Life is full of misery,’ but I changed it to ‘life is full of mystery,’ because we try to stay positive. And no matter what, we face it.” 

 

Hard as it may be to top that, it’s with the last two songs that the album reaches peak poignancy. Tennessean Sarah Pirkle may not be as well known as the other songwriters represented here, but Hendrix has been a fan for years and with good reason. Pirkle’s unforgettable “Piney Rose,” a portrait of an elderly woman determined to spend her last days on earth with stubborn but dignified grace and purpose, is the equal of any top-shelf classic by the likes of Prine, Parton, or even Kris Kristofferson, whose “Pilgrim’s Progress” closes the set. The Kristofferson song is a masterclass in restless soul searching, tellingly written not back in the legend’s white-hot early 1970s prime, but for his 2006 album This Old Road, released when he was a stately 70 years old. And though Hendrix herself is still nearly two full decades away from that particular landmark, her first-hand connection to the song is unassailable. 

 

“To me, ‘Pilgrim’s Progress’ is a code for life,” she says. “And it’s timely, too, with all the division going on in this country today. When the song asks, ‘Am I young enough to believe in revolution?’ — I get that, because I know what it’s like to feel so old that you don’t believe you can still matter. But there are people right now who, no matter their age, they still go out every day and put their life on the line for the better of humanity. So it doesn’t matter how old you are. I just believe in unflappability, in having an unflappable approach to living life.”

 

But there’s a reason why Kristofferson called the song a pilgrim’s progress, and why Hendrix in turn picked it as the title track for the last leg of a five-year marathon she thought would never end. Because as relieved as she is to finally have Project 5 in her rearview, she knows she still has a lot of goals on her journey yet to accomplish. Goals like expanding on community programs for the OYOU, and continuing to overhaul both the property and the art space on Wilory Farm now that it is back open (post quarantine) for on-site classes, workshops, and kids’ songwriting camps. Goals like conquering her vocal issues with therapy so she can return to live performances this August. Goals like writing more songs, and yes, goals like still finishing that book. 

 

“I’ve been writing a whole lot lately and just about have the songs for a new album of original material,” she reports. “And truth be told, I have the chapters to be able to finish the book, too, but it would have been disingenuous to have tried to force it just to finish Project 5. That wouldn’t have ended up doing anybody any good or being something I would want to put my name on. Making it something I can feel proud of is very important to me, because I really feel like this book, that I started way back in 2003, has great potential to help other people who may be dealing with the same health issues as me. And, now that I’m not under the gun and trying to rush it, I know I can do it right.” 

 

Mind, she’s not saying she expects it to be easy, nor will she say how long it may take her. All she knows is that she can, because where there’s a will (or Wilory!), there’s a way. And no matter how hard her resilience may yet be tested going forward, like every song she’s ever written or sung and like every hour she’s ever devoted to the OYOU, it’s all, at heart, a labor of love sustained on faith, hope, and especially gratitude. 

 

“Profound gratitude,” Hendrix says emphatically. “For my friends, for my loved ones, for all of those who have been with from the get-go or who just came on board in the last year by way of the livestreams. Because of them, I can continue to live a life I love in the performing arts, finish this book, build this arts center, and hopefully make a difference in this world long after I’m gone. It’s not a me thing. It’s a “we thing.”

 

About Terri Hendrix

Recognized by Acoustic Guitar magazine as one of Texas’ 20 essential contemporary singer-songwriters, Terri Hendrix has earned fans worldwide for her singular fusion of folk, pop, country, blues, and jazz, delivered with poetic grace, melodic flair, and plenty of wit and wisdom. Along the way, she’s also co-written a Grammy-winning instrumental (the Chicks’ “Lil’ Jack Slade”), and garnered such honors as a star on the South Texas Music Walk of Fame, the Art of Peace Award by Saint Mary’s University in San Antonio, the Distinguished Alumni Award at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, and induction into the Women’s Hall of Fame in San Marcos, Texas. Her master recordings and archives are housed at the esteemed Wittliff Collections at Texas State University. Embodying Texas’ independent spirit, this classically trained vocalist and virtuoso guitar, mandolin, and harmonica player has done it entirely on her own, releasing every album since her 1996 debut on her Wilory Records label — often using a fan-financing model she developed years before crowdfunding arrived.

 

Links

terrihendrix.com

facebook.com/terrihendrix

twitter.com/terrihendrix

instagram.com/terrihendrixmusic

https://www.patreon.com/terrihendrix

ownyourownuniverse.org

Press Release Pilgrim's Progress Project 5.5

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Terri Hendrix Office: Press Release Pilgrim's Progress Project 5.5
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Terri Hendrix Pilgrim's Progress Project 5.5 Downloadable Press Release & One Sheet
TERRI HENDRIX TO RELEASE NEW ALBUM, PILGRIM’S PROGRESS — ON SEPTEMBER 3RD — AS THE FINAL INSTALLMENT OF HER PROJECT 5 CYCLE

The Texas singer-songwriter and her producer Lloyd Maines “keep it country” on her first all-covers album, featuring songs by Kris Kristofferson, Dolly Parton, John Prine, and Jerry Jeff Walker — and a very special cameo by her first guitar teacher: Command Sergeant Major James Hendrix.
TerriHendrixPilgrim'sProgressProject5.5P
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7/12/21 Important Update From Terri Hendrix
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High Res Album Cover
Pilgrim's Progress Project 5.5
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Who is Ann? Project 5.4

Project 5.4 EP: “Who is Ann?”

Acceptance. 

Release Date: Sept. 6th 2019

When Enigma burst on the music scene in the ’90s with their blend of electronica-infused pop music, I became hooked. They have remained an influence in my music ever since, as have elements of rap, folk, country, and basically any artist that colors outside the lines lyrically and musically. From the pedal steel wizardry of Lloyd Maines to my own collection of loops and spoken word pieces, I hammered out a dream of mine. We created a collection of songs where the music is infused with vocal percussion and lyrics to create a mood that addresses depression from profound loss, and the steely reserve to move forward and grab the light. 

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"Who is Ann? P5.4" Album Information
This has the track credits, album information, and a song by song breakdown of the inspiration behind the songs on "Who is Ann?"
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Track Listing 

Focus tracks are in red

All songs have an electronica vibe ... 

As far as the genre goes ... our guess is as good as yours. 

1. Drive 3:18 (radio)

(Terri Hendrix)

2. Happy 3:17

(Terri Hendrix)  

3. Move 3:18

(Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines/Pat Manske)

4. Woman 2:47

(Terri Hendrix)    

5. Grieve 3:58

(Terri Hendrix)

 

Recording:

Produced by Terri Hendrix 

(“Happy,” “Woman,” and Grieve") 

Produced by Lloyd Maines and Terri Hendrix 

(“Move Your Body,” “Drive”)   

Recorded at The Zone in Dripping Springs, Texas and Bubba's Place

Recorded at Wilory Farm, in Martindale, Texas 

Engineered, mixed, and mastered by Pat Manske at The Zone in Dripping Springs, Texas

 

Credits:

Terri Hendrix: Vocals, harmony vocals, loops, samples 

Lloyd Maines: Acoustic, electric guitars, pedal steel, percussion, mandolin, papoose, bass guitar and ukulele

Pat Manske: Keypads 

Drew Womack: Harmony vocals 

 

By Terri Hendrix 

 

1. Drive 

I collect royalty-free electronica samples. For this song we merged pop samples with country music instrumentation. It's a spoken word piece where the pedal steel creates a moody vibe about love and loss. 

2. Happy  

This track features bullies, racists, homophobic religious zealots, hypocrites, mean-spirited politicians, and radio and television anomalies. I've been recording these voices that prey on fear, strive to divide, and distort religion for their own political aspirations for the past 15 years. I've now looped some of them and put them to a quirky little dance track. Why did I do this? Because I'm tired of their "song" and needed to write my own. Because there is no "us versus them." There is just us.

3. Move 

After my sister Tammi's death, I moved one limb at a time to get out of bed. I wrote this right before a show. I was under the weather and didn't want to cancel. But I "moved my body" and it all worked out. There comes a time to get back up. It took me a year. 

4. Woman

Attitude is everything and this song is my tribute to the women champions who stick their neck out, spread their wings, and fly in spite of adversity. 

5. Grieve 

I lost my sister, Tammi Hendrix, at 6:42 p.m. on March 8, 2018. Her death was the direct result of a combination of both alcoholism and remaining in a dysfunctional relationship. She became isolated from those who could have helped her. I still grieve for my sister like a wounded animal. The waves come in and I find myself back in the ocean. That's why there are samples of the ocean in this track. The breathy vocal bursts are deliberate, and signify being unable to breath during the grieving process. 


Talk to a Human Project 5.3

Project 5.3 Album: “Talk to a Human”

Compassion. Love.

Release Date: Sept. 6th 2019

We are in the digital age. There has never been more easy and efficient ways to communicate. If this is the case, why is it so hard to reach somebody? To listen to one another? To celebrate our differences while simultaneously championing those that bring out the good in our society. Musically, we are unapologetically all over the map on this. Because the focus is not on the genre. It's on what's rooted in the heart. 

 

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"Talk to a Human P5.3" Album Information
This has the track credits, album information, and a song by song breakdown of the inspiration behind the songs on "Talk to a Human"
TerriHendrixTalktoa HumanP5.4 .pdf
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Track Listing

Focus tracks are in red 

1. Talk to a Human 3:02

(Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Americana/Folk

2. Mi Madre  3:34 

(Terri Hendrix)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Latin

3. Choice  3:16 

Genre: Americana/Folk

(Terri Hendrix)

4. Way Over Yonder in the Minor Key   4:41

 (Stephen William Bragg/Woody Guthrie)  

Genre: Americana/Folk

5. Don't Meddle in My Mood   3:10 

(Cindy Walker) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

6. Dogging Me  3:39 

(Terri Hendrix/Sonny Terry/Brownie McGhee) 

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues   

7. Worthy  3:12

(Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Americana/Folk

8. WASP 3:45   

(Terri Hendrix)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Bluegrass

9. The Dark   3:43 

(Buddy Mondlock/Guy Clark) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

10. The Water is Wide   3:23

(Traditional/Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Americana/Folk

11. I Hear Your Song 3:39   

(Terri Hendrix)

Genre: Americana/Folk


 

Project 5.3: “Talk to a Human” Album Credits

Recording:

Produced by Lloyd Maines and Terri Hendrix 

Recorded at The Zone in Dripping Springs, Texas and Bubba's Place.

Engineered, mixed, and mastered by Pat Manske at The Zone in Dripping Springs, Texas

Credits:

Terri Hendrix: Vocals, acoustic guitar, harmonica, harmony vocals

Lloyd Maines: Acoustic, electric and baritone guitars, dobro, pedal steel, mandolin, banjo, papoose, bass guitar and ukulele

Glenn Fukunaga: Bass 

Pat Manske: Drums, percussion, keypads 

John Silva: Drums, percussion

Riley Osbourn: Keyboards

Drew Womack: Harmony vocals 

Jeanne Ply- Fiddle

Tracy Miller- Harmony on WASP

Christal Moore, Tay Hoyle, Tracy Miller, Jeanne Ply, Vicki Genfan, Patty Sughrue - Group vocals on WASP 

Song by Song

By Terri Hendrix

 

1. Talk to a Human

This all started with an article I read about "MESSENGER," which is an acronym for "MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging." It was the seventh Discovery class mission, and the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury. Its primary goal was to study the geology, magnetic field, and chemical composition of the planet. After I read this article, I wished a similar project could roll around our planet and study mankind and the effects that the social-media driven culture is having on our ability to communicate and have empathy and compassion for one another. 

 

2. Mi Madre  

The relationship between mother and daughter is a complicated one. The humor within my lyrics covers the wounds, but if you peak under the surface, you'll see the effects alcoholism and abuse can have on a person.

 

3. Choice

I went through some dark times. It took losing faith in myself to find my way again. Once I turned 50 I began to doubt myself and my ability to make music. Health issues added to my crippling self doubt. For me, "freedom" was making positive choices about my future and launching the OYOU (https://www.ownyourownuniverse.org). I now define my success by the fabric of my character and not through the eyeballs of oftentimes jaded and cynical music industry insiders and gatekeepers. I own a whole lot of land. I open and close my own gates. 

 

4. Way Over Yonder in the Minor Key   

Billy Bragg set music to the words of Woody Guthrie and ended up with this song that touches on abuse, promiscuity, and the ending of innocence. At least that's my interpretation. It's abstract and frankly I've never met anyone that interprets it the same. That's why I covered it. What does it mean? You decide. 

 

5. Don't Meddle in My Mood   

The men get the winning cup and all the glory when it comes to songwriting here in Texas. Van Zandt, Clark, Earle, and on and on. What about the women? Case in point, Cindy Walker. A native Texan, she was a true craftsman, and often tailored particular songs to specific recording artists. She had Top 10 hits that spread over five decades. Another reason why I covered this song is because I can totally relate to it and this country blues style is among my favorites to sing. 

 

6. Dogging Me  

I grabbed the chorus of a Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee tune and wrote my own verses about someone that enjoys belittling the very person they are supposed to lift up and support.

 

7. Worthy  

I was gifted a bright orange 1994 Chevy Sidestep. Having this truck to use on my property has proven invaluable. One day I was cleaning it and stumbled across a plastic tag from the gas station Allsup's with the name "Mandie" on it. It got my wheels turning. I wondered who and where she was. That morphed into a song about being worthy of my friends. From the friend that gave me the truck to my friends that circle their wagons when I need them, I am lucky to have this handful of loved ones in my life. I strive to be worthy of them. 

 

8. WASP  

The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) were a U.S. Army Air Forces program that hired around 1,100 civilian women with non-combat military flight duties during World War II. They were the first women to fly U.S. military aircraft. They tested planes and shuttled them from base to base and oftentimes did the work that men refused to do or were incapable of doing as well as they could. Some women lost their lives on the job and were denied military benefits and burials. The women had to collectively pool their money to pay for their fallen comrades to bring them home. I first learned about them at an exhibit featuring their story at the Bob Bullock museum in Austin, Texas. I've wanted to write my own interpretation of their experience ever since.

 

9. The Dark    

I first covered this song for a compilation called, "This One's for Him: A Tribute to Guy Clark." But I wanted to record it again, from scratch, for "Talk to a Human" just because it fit too much not to. The song is a painting about there always being light in the darkness. And the importance of that light to see through dark skies. I consider it a companion piece to the Carter Family song "Sun of Your Soul," which I recorded for "The Slaughterhouse Sessions." 

 

10. The Water is Wide  

I've collected versions of this song since I was in high school. At one time I think I owned every recorded version of this song. It was time for me to do my own interpretation. It's a bookend to "Trouble's on Your Mind," a song about self-sabotage that I recorded on "The Slaughterhouse Sessions." I "brought the mountain to me" and the water closed in over my head. My friends kept me from drowning. They brought a boat, lifted me up, and ferried me to the other side. 

 

11. I Hear Your Song    

I first got this idea after seeing the animated film "Happy Feet." The movie's about the importance of discovering one's own "heart song," to attract true love and happiness. It's my mission to hear the heart songs of my friends, family, and colleagues, and to support them. I also hope that my own heart song is heard and that my music will continue to be heard when my time on this earth is done. 


Slaughterhouse Sessions Project 5.2

Project 5.2 Album: “The Slaughterhouse Sessions”

Faith. Hope. Love. 

Released: 10/7/2016

My second album in Project 5 is an acoustic blues and gospel record. We recorded some of these tracks at a former slaughterhouse in El Prado, New Mexico. Now converted into an eclectic guesthouse for family, friends, and artists, it's a beautiful and inspiring place to visit and write. As an animal lover, I originally shied away from naming the record after a slaughterhouse. But the truth is, the title fit the music and subject matter. On this album, the groove made for a comfortable place to tackle uncomfortable subject matter like religious hypocrisy, war, poverty, and racism. We intentionally composed and arranged the music so as to create tension within the songs. In the end though, regardless of what I'm singing about or the music it's folded into, "The Slaughterhouse Sessions" is still about eventually arriving at a better place than where you began — be it mentally, spiritually, or physically.  

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"The Slaughterhouse Sessions P5.2" Album Information
This has the track credits, album information, and a song by song breakdown of the inspiration behind the songs on "The Slaughterhouse Sessions"
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Track Listing  

Focus tracks are in red 

1. The News 3:04 (radio)

(Terri Hendrix) 

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues

2. Bury the Devil 3:58

 (Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues/Political 

3. Trouble's on Your Mind 2:52

(Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues 

4. Ain’t It a Shame 3:55

(Elder Roma Wilson)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues/Political/Harmonica 

5. I Will Arise 3:52

(J.Hart/Traditional/Arranged by Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Gospel/Folk

6. One of These Mornings 2:34

(J.C. Burris)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues/Harmonica 

7. Crocodile Man 2:59

(David Robert Carter) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

8. Call You to the Carpet 3:49

(Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues/Political 

9. The Lowdown 3:26

(Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues 

10. Double Shift Tuesday 2:46

(Terri Hendrix/Slaid Cleaves)

Genre: Americana/Folk/Blues 

11. Sun of the Soul 3:59

(A.P. Carter) 

Genre: Gospel/Folk

 

 

“The Slaughterhouse Sessions — Project 5.2” Album Credits 

 

Recording:

Produced by Lloyd Maines and Terri Hendrix 

Recorded at Bubba's Studio and The Zone in Dripping Springs, Texas

Engineered, mixed, and mastered by Pat Manske at The Zone in Dripping Springs, Texas

 

Musician Credits:

Terri Hendrix: Vocals, acoustic guitar, harmonica, harmony vocals

Lloyd Maines: Acoustic and electric guitar, mandolin, banjo, papoose, bass guitar, harmony vocals

Leeann Atherton: Harmony Vocals “Bury the Devil” and “Call You to the Carpet”

Glenn Fukunaga: Bass 

Pat Manske: Drums, percussion

John Silva: Drums, percussion

Riley Osbourn: Keyboards

Bukka Allen: Accordion


Love You Strong Project 5.1

Project 5.1 Album: “Love You Strong” 

Love. Loyalty. Friendship.

Released: 2/5/16

Remixed, remastered, and re-released: 1/20/17

"Love You Strong" is a collection of songs that put the concept of love under the microscope. Love isn’t all hearts and flowers and it’s not just about broken hearts. Love is being there for someone in both sickness and in health. It’s the unspoken vows given in lifelong friendships. It’s the marriage of trust, loyalty, and convictions that stand the test of time. However, this isn’t an album of “love songs.” It's not a happy record. It's not a sad record. It's an honest record about stepping in and being there for someone when the world steps out. Musically, it’s very straight forward. We intentionally composed and arranged the music so that the songs didn't leave the earthy parameters of storytelling.  

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"Love You Strong P5.1" Album Information
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Track Listing

1. Feel the Time 4:32

(Terri Hendrix) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

2. Vulnerable 3:40

(Terri Hendrix) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

3. Love You Strong 4:07

(Terri Hendrix/Dana Pendland Jones) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

4. The Rant 3:50

(Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines) 

Genre: Americana/Folk/Humor/Bluegrass

5. The Texas Star 3:57

(Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines)

Genre: Americana/Folk 

6. Calle de los Niños 4:34

(Terri Hendrix) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

7. Northern Lights 3:01

(Terri Hendrix) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

8. Earth-Kind Rose 5:19

(Terri Hendrix) 

Genre: Americana/Folk

9. Fifty Shades of Hey 3:52

(Terri Hendrix) 

Genre: Americana/Folk/Humor 

10. Found 3:18

(Terri Hendrix) 

Genre: Americana/Folk 

11. Mingulay Boat Song 4:29

(Traditional/Terri Hendrix/Lloyd Maines) 

Genre: Irish/Folk

 

“Love You Strong — Project 5.1” Album Credits 

 

Recording:

Produced by Lloyd Maines and Terri Hendrix 

Recorded at Bubba's Studio and The Zone in Dripping Springs, Texas

Additional recording: Cedar Creek Recording in Austin, Texas, by Wade Josey

Additional recording on “The Texas Star” by Cisco Gilliland

Engineered, mixed, and mastered by Pat Manske at The Zone in Dripping Springs, Texas

 

Musician Credits:

Terri Hendrix: Vocals, acoustic guitar, harmonica, banjo, ukulele, papoose, harmony vocals

Lloyd Maines: Acoustic and electric guitar, pedal steel, dobro, mandolin, banjo, papoose, baritone and bass guitar, harmony vocals

Glenn Fukunaga: Bass guitar

Pat Manske: Drums, percussion

John Silva: Drums, percussion

Riley Osbourn: Keyboards

Bukka Allen: Accordion

Dennis Ludiker: Fiddle

Eliza Gilkyson: Harmony “Texas Star”

Drew Womack: Harmonies "Mingulay Boat Song"